Night of the Living Dead

USA 1968. Dir: George E. Romero. 96 min. DCP

“One of the three most important and influential horror films ever made.”
KIM NEWMAN, SIGHT & SOUND

FIRST-EVER RESTORATION! A radical, game-changing work of savage social-commentary-cum-horror, the landmark first film by splatter icon George E. Romero — who died in July in his adopted hometown of Toronto — established the rules of the zombie playbook we’ve stuck to ever since. A drive-in cash cow that ushered in an entire generation of American indies, Romero’s DIY cheapie, shot outside Pittsburgh with a cast of unknowns, tells the smart, slyly-simple story of a group of strangers barricaded inside a farmhouse besieged by a horde of lumbering, flesh-eating ghouls. (“Zombie” isn’t even uttered.) Romero, bucking convention of the era, casts a black actor (Duane Jones) as the hero, offs the assumed white hero in the first reel, and delivers a shock ending that still unsettles. Though the film caused a furor for its amped-up gore, it’s the Trojan-horsing of ’60s protest issues — Vietnam, American racism — that proved what the genre was truly capable of.


FRIGHTENING SCENES
PERSONS UNDER 14 MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY AN ADULT

 

REVIEWS

"Holds up as a stark, eerie, and unrelenting parable of dread ... There’s a brute force in Night of the Living Dead that catches one in the throat."

Slant | full review

"A groundbreaking, trendsetting masterpiece of modern American cinema."

MUBI Notebook | full review