Les amours imaginaires: Xavier Dolan x 3

SEPTEMBER 16, 19
OCTOBER
13-14

“Xavier Dolan may not be the new Jean-Luc Godard, but he could be the new Leos Carax. And Laurence Anyways could be his Les amants du Pont-Neuf ... The Québécois enfant terrible dazzlingly demonstrates his prodigious talent as a metteur-en-scène and director of actors.”
PAUL SCHRADER, THEARTSDESK.COM

“I have just seen Carax’s Holy Motors, which I thought was genius. I loved it so much I almost shat my pants out of jealousy.”
XAVIER DOLAN

In a programming cycle in which we celebrate, with a major retrospective, the dazzling talents of French provocateur and former enfant terrible Leos Carax, we thought it might be a fitting time to also spotlight the wondrous films of Québécois wunderkind Xavier Dolan, whose own precocious career and rapid international ascendancy have many parallels with Carax’s thirty years before. Both Dolan and Carax were darlings of Cannes at a tender age; both have an artistic sensibility that is extravagantly romantic and melodramatic and informed by a surpassing, self-conscious love of movies, in particular the meta-cinematic stylizations of the classic French New Wave; both have an especial love of (and saw their early films compared to) the films of Jean-Luc Godard. (In Dolan's case, here and elsewhere, the comparisons have been to Carax's films as well.)

Dolan, now 24, has been admirably, preternaturally prolific: his fourth feature, Tom at the Farm (Tom à la ferme), is slated to debut at Venice and elsewhere on the festival circuit this fall. We revisit here his first three features, all of them among the most discussed and most honoured Canadian films of the last five years.

Click for film notes + showtimes

Recent Showings

The precocious, provocative first film of 20-year-old enfant terrible Dolan won a host of national and international honours, including three prizes at Cannes.
A year after his debut, Dolan roared back with this sumptuous and buoyant follow-up, selected for Cannes's Un Certain Regard section.
"Where an older director might have muted some of the more operatic scenes, fearing accusations of affectation, Dolan fearlessly lets fly."